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"WHat's in the package?" - Royal Mail Special Delivery


Blockhead

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Having never posted any gold or silver before I wondered what people tend to say to the busy-bodies behind the post office desk who are 'just doing their job' when they ask what's in the package you're sending?

Generally when I've posted items they ask what's in the package and ask if it's worth more than £20. I don't particularly want to tell them it's gold or silver, and they seem nosey enough to ask what it is rather than simply is it a prohibited item, but if I make something up I don't want to not be covered if I ever had to make a claim. I understand special delivery is the only RM service that would protect me for precious metals.

Appreciate people's experiences with this.

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The R Mail ask me the value of the coin/s as this will affect the cost of posting, I think they only cover it up to the value of £2.500 I make sure they know and the teller records it in the event I have to make a claim.  

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I just say collectable metal tokens and it's all good. They are trained to ask what is in it so that if you do say silver coin they will insist on upselling to special delivery or parcelforce where it costs an arm and a leg.

SD will have cover for PM's and the claim process has absolutely no baring on what is said to the nosey cashier at the local post office!

All you will need to do (in the event of a claim) is prove that you posted it and what the value of the item was, usually done by proof that someone paid you etc.

Visit my website for all my Hand Poured Silver: http://backyardbullion.com

And check out my YouTube channel 

https://www.youtube.com/backyardbullion

 

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18 minutes ago, Blockhead said:

Thanks @BackyardBullion. If I needed to make a claim but payment had been made by bank transfer would I have to get a paper statement from my local bank branch (while there is still such a thing) as proof?

Probably, but an online statement might work. The best yet is to get written confirmation from the customer that they paid what you say as well.

Visit my website for all my Hand Poured Silver: http://backyardbullion.com

And check out my YouTube channel 

https://www.youtube.com/backyardbullion

 

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I can't remember the last time I was asked. I know the folks down at the local post office and they know me so I think they always assume its related to my business and don't ask anymore. Plus they know that I'll tell them if the item is something of concern to them like a phone with a battery. This is generally why they ask the question - to ensure the item isn't on the prohibited list or to affix appropriate labels if the item contains a lithium ion battery.

Obviously this isn't appicable advice for most people so I'd go with what @BackyardBullion said above. That'll get the job done

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5 minutes ago, AppleZippoandMetronome said:

I can't remember the last time I was asked. I know the folks down at the local post office and they know me so I think they always assume its related to my business and don't ask anymore. Plus they know that I'll tell them if the item is something of concern to them like a phone with a battery. This is generally why they ask the question - to ensure the item isn't on the prohibited list or to affix appropriate labels if the item contains a lithium ion battery.

Obviously this isn't appicable advice for most people so I'd go with what @BackyardBullion said above. That'll get the job done

As a mum who is a sub-post mistress, the main reason for asking is not to be nosey but to check something prohibited isnt being sent properly ie batteries! They get a telling off if these items are found not sent correctly! Obvs some PO folk are a bit nosey!

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Just now, h103efa said:

As a mum who is a sub-post mistress, the main reason for asking is not to be nosey but to check something prohibited isnt being sent properly ie batteries! They get a telling off if these items are found not sent correctly! Obvs some PO folk are a bit nosey!

Thats exactly what I put in my post. Like I said I know them and have a good chat with them whenever I'm down there. They explained this to me and I have no reason to doubt them. I've sold items with lithium batteries inside and saw them apply the warning labels. It makes perfect sense to me.

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Just now, AppleZippoandMetronome said:

Thats exactly what I put in my post. Like I said I know them and have a good chat with them whenever I'm down there. They explained this to me and I have no reason to doubt them. I've sold items with lithium batteries inside and saw them apply the warning labels. It makes perfect sense to me.

Soz @AppleZippoandMetronome, i was actually suppose to write that you were spot on while quoting you. Thats what you get for multi-tasking and trying to watch Killing Eve at the same time!

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I've been asked a few times, depends on the person but was asked recently and I said "a coin"... "a coin, what sort of coin like a normal coin?" To which I replied " it's a ngc graded pf70 ultra cameo 1/4 oz gold proof tiger, one of only 4 graded at 70". She said "ok, so not batterys then?" and since has not asked me again.

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57 minutes ago, h103efa said:

As a mum who is a sub-post mistress, the main reason for asking is not to be nosey but to check something prohibited isnt being sent properly ie batteries! They get a telling off if these items are found not sent correctly! Obvs some PO folk are a bit nosey!

This is true and my local lot ask if its batteries or whatever,however there's one lady down there that is upselling 100% as she just insists on higher postage.

you'll need £7 postage on a £16 item then and just starts putting it through,then argues with you trying to strong arm people into the higher postage costs on low priced goods.

She's a bitch really 😂

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Self employed from web/ebay/internet sales since 1999. 

Stock answer to Gestapo PO clerk is " computer parts/memory card/hard drive" ------> one size fits all . say, an answer that is appropriate to size of package

Adjust to size/weight of package

None of their feckin business, whats in it. 

....................... it come to bite me on the bum, PO clerk asked me can you get me a cheap memory card to upgrade her new phone , after the 1000s i had sent "suposedly"  via recorded /special delivery 

i donated my own memory card to keep the peace to her and now always in the good books 

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Over the last week or so I have been sending a lot of 1st class signed for, (Which doesnt actually cover PM) the same woman has been asking me every time what is in the package and what is the value.

I will admit the panic set in the first time as I was genuinely taken back that it was being asked, I felt like a criminal all of a sudden because I already knew PMs are not covered so like a true hardened criminal I spilled my guts and in less than a second told her it was silver bullion coins.

After a weird look from her and a follow up question of "silver coins?",  I just said "yes, silver coins from the Royal Mint". She then asked me the value again and took the package.

Not only did the package get taken but nothing was mentioned about PMs not being covered by 1st class signed for,  so for me if anything was to go wrong (Touch woods it doesnt) then I would be complaining if the PM contents were not covered come time to claim because out of 20 or so packages so far it has still never been mentioned that PMs are not covered.

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Same woman / same Post Office / same stories. Don't you realise you guys all live in the same town?  Next time discretely check the queue around you. If there's a shifty looking geezer with sweating brow who's clutching a package with 2 white knuckled hands then say hi to your fellow Silver Forum member. Then mug him 😊

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Our local post girl signs on my behalf if the package will fit through the letterbox. The arrangement suits both of us but we would be screwed if anything went wrong.

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10 hours ago, terakris said:

I've been asked a few times, depends on the person but was asked recently and I said "a coin"... "a coin, what sort of coin like a normal coin?" To which I replied " it's a ngc graded pf70 ultra cameo 1/4 oz gold proof tiger, one of only 4 graded at 70". She said "ok, so not batterys then?" and since has not asked me again.

What was that my one lol. Ps is it only 1 of 4 at pf70 

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I’m completely baffled about something and received no explanation about it. Apparently, you can send bullion items via Royal Mail, but not via DHL which are listed as prohibited items. I regularly order bullion coins from Royal Mint Bullion which sends them via DHL. In fact, RMB are unique in this respect because my other dealers send bullion items via RM special delivery. Can someone please explain how is it possible for RMB to send bullion via DHL when it’s prohibited? I just don’t get it.

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On 22/06/2019 at 09:15, kimchi said:

My local is always heaving so you have to speak pretty loudly for everyone to hear, but stool samples and flavoured prophylactics are two that always seem to get a good crowd reaction :)

My post office would most likely class stool samples as very important,So she'd charge you max postage for that 😂

 

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16 minutes ago, blackadder said:

My post office would most likely class stool samples as very important,So she'd charge you max postage for that 😂

 

It depends totally on pedigree and vintage. A John Lennon 1965 (Philadelphia) for example is almost priceless, so you want maximum insurance and peace of mind. An unattributed Spice Girls (Wembley, 2019 Reunion Tour) has no sort of premium over a regular sample really, those can go regular first class :)

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I am routinely asked by the postal workers if there's anything officially considered dangerous, like batteries, chemicals, or perishable. They never up front ask what's specifically in the package. I simply answer no to their question, and that's the end of it.

If I need to insure it, I simply state what it generally is and its value. No need to be so specific. 

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On 21/06/2019 at 23:31, MancunianStacker said:

I like to wind them up a little and say I’ve read their prohibited items list online and I can confirm that its contents are not on the list. 🖕

That's more or less what I say and they usually leave it like that as upon further questioning I've shown they know less about their regulations than I do after I have spent some time reading their website.

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