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How Much is a Low Certificate Number Worth? e.g. #001 on 2022 Two Ounce Gold Proof UK Monarchs George I


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How Much is a Low Certificate Number Worth? e.g. #001 on 2022 Two Ounce Gold Proof UK Monarchs George I

2022GoldProof2OunceTheBritishMonarchsCollectionElizabethIIGeorgeIPoundSterling200poundsCoinWithBoxwi-eUnitedKingdomTheRoyalMintcertificateissuenumber1crop.thumb.jpg.c49da480bf56f067a0dcd1183f2cff4d.jpg

This is not a request for help in pricing, more a platform for discussion.

What does everybody out there (or in here) think about certificate numbers?

2022GoldProof2OunceTheBritishMonarchsCollectionElizabethIIGeorgeIPoundSterling200poundsCoinWithBoxwithCertCollectableUnitedKingdomTheRoyalMintreversecrop.thumb.jpg.80d009e0b166a4024e75fae5fe1108ee.jpg

From 1714 to 1727, George I was on the front side of British coins, now he is relegated to the backside.

2022GoldProof2OunceTheBritishMonarchsCollectionElizabethIIGeorgeIPoundSterling200poundsCoinWithBoxwi-UnitedKingdomTheRoyalMintreverseinpresentationboxcrop.thumb.jpg.ff46b38a2d031be27ce6ac112cce7bff.jpg

It does look good on a large gold coin.

2022GoldProof2OunceTheBritishMonarchsCollectionElizabethIIGeorgeIPoundSterling200poundsCoinWithBoxwithCertCollectableUnitedKingdomTheRoyalMintobversecrop.thumb.jpg.ff2f0b96e6acf4acbe47de2251f65315.jpg

... and the booklet:

2022GoldProof2OunceTheBritishMonarchsCollectionElizabethIIGeorgeIPoundSterling200poundsCoinWithBoxwi-ertCollectableUnitedKingdomTheRoyalMininfobookletcrop.thumb.jpg.5848e7cb4bd35ff721247165b4811fe1.jpg

All comments and opinions welcome.

P.S. Don't tell Barry!

😎

 

Chards

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I think it would fetch a premium to a certain very small group of collectors with deep pockets and a competitive streak.

I wouldn't pay any more for it myself.

I think someone on here recently received certificate 001 for one of the Platinum Jubilee coins where the issue limit was 70 and I seem to remember a similar question being asked then.  Can't remember the consensus answer, though!

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Modern issues are just not my thing.  

If I wanted an early minted coin I would go for ex-trial of the Pyx.

I suspect in Llanristrant, they have a big bucket of coins and certs and chuck them into the wooden boxes at random.  

 

best

Dicker

Not my circus, not my monkeys

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1 hour ago, dicker said:

Modern issues are just not my thing.  

If I wanted an early minted coin I would go for ex-trial of the Pyx.

I suspect in Llanristrant, they have a big bucket of coins and certs and chuck them into the wooden boxes at random.  

best

Dicker

I would never rate an ex-Pyx trial coin very highly, partly because of the handling and possible damage they would have received, which all makes them less desirable and valuable.

Marketing them as something special is probably creative, but gimmickly IMO.

Random? If the production is all done as one batch, then possibly, although if not all coins have been sold, I think certificate numbers will be used in batches, with lowest numbered batches used first. So if the issue limit is 1000, but the Mint make a first batch of 250, then these will be numbered 1 to 250, but may be random within the batch. A sceond batch might be numbers 251 to 500, etc.

😎

Chards

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There are people out there who value such things so it is entirely down to what a collector will pay at the time.
When I used to fly regularly out of Heathrow I used to visit the whisky store and saw Japanese business people buy a couple of the most expensive whiskies as gifts. Price was over £2,000 a bottle. I quizzed the store manager who said this was quite common as these business people gift them because in their culture it is the value of the gift that counts not the thought. I don't think most people would ever be able to taste a difference compared with a good £40 single malt but that's another story.

Cert 001 could be of value to similar people with deep pockets.

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I don't know about the value, but I do like a good serial number, and number 1 is the daddy!

Undoubtedly many people would pay a premium for it, but how much I have no idea.

Price it up and let the market decide!

If I find a banknote with a serial number that takes my fancy I generally keep it - as long as it in decent shape.

Edited by TheShinyStuff
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49 minutes ago, Pete said:

There are people out there who value such things so it is entirely down to what a collector will pay at the time.
When I used to fly regularly out of Heathrow I used to visit the whisky store and saw Japanese business people buy a couple of the most expensive whiskies as gifts. Price was over £2,000 a bottle. I quizzed the store manager who said this was quite common as these business people gift them because in their culture it is the value of the gift that counts not the thought. I don't think most people would ever be able to taste a difference compared with a good £40 single malt but that's another story.

Cert 001 could be of value to similar people with deep pockets.

could be that Confucius says theres one born every minute of the day.  😆

Only fools rush in where Angels fear to tread

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20 minutes ago, TheShinyStuff said:

I don't know about the value, but I do like a good serial number, and number 1 is the daddy!

Undoubtedly many people would pay a premium for it, but how much I have no idea.

Price it up and let the market decide!

If I find a banknote with a serial number that takes my fancy I generally keep it - as long as it in decent shape.

Of course 007 would be the best on a James Bond coin.

I think cert numbers might make greater percentage difference on lower cost coins.

With banknotes, the serial number is an integral part of the note, whereas with a coin, the cert is separate.

 

Chards

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25 minutes ago, LawrenceChard said:

Of course 007 would be the best on a James Bond coin.

I think cert numbers might make greater percentage difference on lower cost coins.

With banknotes, the serial number is an integral part of the note, whereas with a coin, the cert is separate.

 

You're right of course that the CoA is not an integral part of a coin, and could be traded as a separate entity. I've no doubt such a CoA could fetch a reasonable sum on its own - maybe £100 given the value of this particular coin - but I'm guessing here. I'd imagine some avid collectors would commit a grievous crime to have the full set (maybe pf70s if they are so onclined) all with CoA #001.

I have a RM silver  bar serial no A 02020 which I really like, obviously adds no value whatsoever, but it appeals to me, and I'm sure I'm not alone...

 

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11 hours ago, paulmerton said:

It looks like it's your lucky day, @LawrenceChard - according to this coin dealer, a low certificate number could increase the value by up to 83%! :D 

image.thumb.png.359252899cfe94ba4e88ebf757f4436d.png

I doubt if that would / wll apply to a coin with an RM issue price of £5010!

Who could that dealer have been?

😎

Chards

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11 hours ago, TheShinyStuff said:

You're right of course that the CoA is not an integral part of a coin, and could be traded as a separate entity. I've no doubt such a CoA could fetch a reasonable sum on its own - maybe £100 given the value of this particular coin - but I'm guessing here. I'd imagine some avid collectors would commit a grievous crime to have the full set (maybe pf70s if they are so onclined) all with CoA #001.

I have a RM silver  bar serial no A 02020 which I really like, obviously adds no value whatsoever, but it appeals to me, and I'm sure I'm not alone...

 

It's not so much whether a cetificate could be traded as a separate entity, although it happens, more that a certificate is not an integral part of the coin. Certificates could be interchanged. It would be rather difficult to transfer a banknot serial number to a different banknote, or to lose it.

Your A 02020 serial number looks good, and probably does add soome saleability and therefore value, to the right person.

😎

Chards

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5 minutes ago, LawrenceChard said:

It's not so much whether a cetificate could be traded as a separate entity, although it happens, more that a certificate is not an integral part of the coin. Certificates could be interchanged. It would be rather difficult to transfer a banknot serial number to a different banknote, or to lose it.

Your A 02020 serial number looks good, and probably does add soome saleability and therefore value, to the right person.

😎

Agreed on both counts. Now we just need to sort the postage thing and we'll be on the same page!!!

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For me personally, i wouldn't pay more for a specific COA number, however i can understand why there would be a small subset of people that would pay more for number 1 of something. Also, there are numbers of cultural significance, 8 i believe is significant in China where it is considered a lucky number. So i could see them paying more for number 88 out of 100 for example, especially if it's meant as a gift.

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2 minutes ago, GBStacking said:

For me personally, i wouldn't pay more for a specific COA number, however i can understand why there would be a small subset of people that would pay more for number 1 of something. Also, there are numbers of cultural significance, 8 i believe is significant in China where it is considered a lucky number. So i could see them paying more for number 88 out of 100 for example, especially if it's meant as a gift.

Yes, plus lots of other numbers such as sequential or repeating numbers, significant dates etc. Things that can make an impersonal lump of metal more personal to the owner.

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18 hours ago, DavePanda said:

I have a Munich 1oz Silver Panda with a COA 000000    now how did that happen ?😀

According to that COA it didn't ;) 

Looking to buy: 1838 and 1839 full sovereign and the 1924 full bullion sovereign.

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