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Natural Toning


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I am positive this has been done before, but I am curious to hear from some of our newer members.

While also into a bit of collecting, primarily I consider myself a stacker.  However, I can't help but get a little excited if I'm at an LCS and come across a nicely toned coin mixed among a bunch of plain ones.  I will always be sure to grab that example, even over ones that may be in superior overall condition.

Curious to hear everyone's thoughts on naturally toned silver.  If given the choice, would you prefer your old silver to be toned, and if so to what extent?  Does you believe it should add value to a given piece or detract from it?

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Eggs yes eggs can naturally tone you boil them peel them and leave them, but dont eat the eggs after!!!

Unless you want to shart through the eye of a needle.

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I don't like toned coins.  In fact, if it is a newer uncirculated coin that has some toning on it, i will give it a quick dip in EZ-Zest.  Older coins with numismatic value I would not dip but may soak in acetone to remove any organic debris from it (like tape or other residue).

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1 hour ago, MetalMandible said:

If given the choice, would you prefer your old silver to be toned, and if so to what extent?  Does you believe it should add value to a given piece or detract from it?

An old 100+ years Morgan would look completely wrong without natural toning imo

"It might make sense just to get some in case it catches on"  - Satoshi Nakamoto 2009

"Its going to Zero" - Peter Schiff 2013

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I don't get hung up about toned silver as it really is a kind of rust.
During the 40's and 50's when London was choking in dense fog ( pollution ) and every building was jet black from soot caused by burning coal, your silver in those days would have toned rapidly. Even indoors - coal fires and parents that smoked back to back cigarettes - your nice shiny silver would quickly tone.

Some will call this "patina" so the latest iron bridge over the Grand Union Canal, unpainted, is showing a lovely patina but to most people looks like common rust.

😀

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5 hours ago, dicker said:

I have some silver £1’s which are in their original RM box, capsules and are now toned.  Brown/red toning around the rims after 30 odd years.  

I am quite fond of the edges toning, for a while that was most preferred.. Recently I acquired some 1967 Canadian Flying Geese, some of which have taken on a bluish hue that is pretty spectacular.  I believe it to be a result of time (and not eggs 😂), but still I am left wondering, as it is almost too brilliant...

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11 hours ago, MetalMandible said:

I am quite fond of the edges toning, for a while that was most preferred.. Recently I acquired some 1967 Canadian Flying Geese, some of which have taken on a bluish hue that is pretty spectacular.  I believe it to be a result of time (and not eggs 😂), but still I am left wondering, as it is almost too brilliant...

Love that 1967 series, it is simple but beautiful. I just purchased a 1967 BU set as well.  The modern 2020 2oz canada goose silver coin is also one of my favourite.

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When I was younger and newer to collecting, I loved blast white coins.

Now though, I much prefer toned* coins. I actively hate proof coins and blast white coins as I just think of these as cleaned and polished, even though on newer coins they aren't.

*By toned, I generally mean grey tones. I am not a fan of bright rainbow toning. It just looks like an oil stain on the road.

I also like toned gold, especially copper spots, like freckles!

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Older coins that have a grey tone (usually caused by handling) really show the detail of a coin. I have occasionally artificially toned modern bullion coins to bring out the detail - without toning some 'busy' coins are virtually impossible to see if you're getting on a bit....

A collector will accept toning on a coin as part of it's history - A stacker shouldn't really care either way, silver is silver.

 

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