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1989 half sov


Dougall1

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1 hour ago, Swampy said:

...not marketed well in 1989...

 

 

Au contraire, the marketing of the 1989 sovereigns was, IMO, one of the best I have seen from the Royal Mint.  I still remember reading the Sunday Times newspaper and finding a colour advert for the coins.  At the time I could not afford even the half sovereign.  But the advert planted a seed and some thirty years later I was able to buy a double sovereign.  The sales figure of nearly 22,000 for the half sovereign, I think, shows the success of the marketing campaign.

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1 hour ago, Zhorro said:

Au contraire, the marketing of the 1989 sovereigns was, IMO, one of the best I have seen from the Royal Mint.  I still remember reading the Sunday Times newspaper and finding a colour advert for the coins.  At the time I could not afford even the half sovereign.  But the advert planted a seed and some thirty years later I was able to buy a double sovereign.  The sales figure of nearly 22,000 for the half sovereign, I think, shows the success of the marketing campaign.

Indeed, in those days marketing advertisers had to work for their money, not like these days. Whole industries such as British Gas and British Telecom were sold to the public on the back of wholesale TV, Billboard and Newspaper campaigns. And let's not forget, back then there were only two TV stations carrying advertising too.

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@Zhorro

Thanks.  My view is they are fab and a must have! 

My understanding is that the new 1989 design was not particularly popular at issue and the Royal Mint did not sell out of its entire issue limit.  This was attributed to the marketing with collectors wanting StGeorge and the Dragon and failing to understand the reason behind the design.  

This perhaps is why they waited a long time before changing the design again?

either way - it’s rather successful now! 
 

 

 

 

 

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Pretty sure the full sov that was on TCC auction went for £2100 today. That's overpriced in my opinion, but £1800 might be ok. £1500-£1700 is ideal.

 

I'm after one myself if anyone is selling

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Found some interesting figures for the 1989 mintage/cost figures on a visit to the RM in 1998. The '89 half sov. was selling for £79.95 ex 10,000. By 1998 the price was £84.00 ex 7,500 a very small increase over 9 years. Full Sovereigns, including the 1989 were selling for £149 from 1983 to 1998 (15 years!) My first proof sovereign in 1997 was also £149 but to me that seemed expensive compared to £50 for a bullion sovereign and about £75 for a shield back. I believe the gold price had been very stable over this period at about $325 or so. Lastly, the full set was selling at £1150 with a mintage of 5000. However the secondary market was much lower. I paid £850 for the 4 coin set in 1997 which was the going price apparently. Lucky me perhaps! What is unusual, as already noted, is that the 1989 full sovereign is now more valuable than the double sovereign! Anyway here's a photo of the 4 coin set for reference.....

 

 

IMG_2385.JPG

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1 hour ago, Britannia47 said:

Found some interesting figures for the 1989 mintage/cost figures on a visit to the RM in 1998. The '89 half sov. was selling for £79.95 ex 10,000. By 1998 the price was £84.00 ex 7,500 a very small increase over 9 years. Full Sovereigns, including the 1989 were selling for £149 from 1983 to 1998 (15 years!) My first proof sovereign in 1997 was also £149 but to me that seemed expensive compared to £50 for a bullion sovereign and about £75 for a shield back. I believe the gold price had been very stable over this period at about $325 or so. Lastly, the full set was selling at £1150 with a mintage of 5000. However the secondary market was much lower. I paid £850 for the 4 coin set in 1997 which was the going price apparently. Lucky me perhaps! What is unusual, as already noted, is that the 1989 full sovereign is now more valuable than the double sovereign! Anyway here's a photo of the 4 coin set for reference.....

 

 

IMG_2385.JPG

 

if you say the set can be sold at £5,600(ebay with bids 06/06/2021) then it has gained ~6.6 times.

the bullion £50 sov bought at the same time has gained ~6.2 times(£310).

on these figures the 1989 set has performed very similar % wise to bullion since 1997.

 

HH

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On 28/06/2021 at 17:10, Britannia47 said:

Found some interesting figures for the 1989 mintage/cost figures on a visit to the RM in 1998. The '89 half sov. was selling for £79.95 ex 10,000. By 1998 the price was £84.00 ex 7,500 a very small increase over 9 years. Full Sovereigns, including the 1989 were selling for £149 from 1983 to 1998 (15 years!) My first proof sovereign in 1997 was also £149 but to me that seemed expensive compared to £50 for a bullion sovereign and about £75 for a shield back. I believe the gold price had been very stable over this period at about $325 or so. Lastly, the full set was selling at £1150 with a mintage of 5000. However the secondary market was much lower. I paid £850 for the 4 coin set in 1997 which was the going price apparently. Lucky me perhaps! What is unusual, as already noted, is that the 1989 full sovereign is now more valuable than the double sovereign! Anyway here's a photo of the 4 coin set for reference.....

 

 

IMG_2385.JPG

Thank you so much for posting this picture. I too have a 4 coin set which I bought in 2018 and I was slightly perturbed that the coins were displayed with alternate sides. Your coins are displayed identically to my own which removes my concern that somebody had removed at least 2 of them from their capsules at some time to display them as seen above.

There may be exceptions, but the modern sets I generally see pictured all display the same side of the coins, which fits in nicely with those of us who confess to having some OCD. My set is lacking the blue ribbon though - unless it’s tucked away behind the inner backing of the box, which I doubt. I’m 1001 away from you, with COA 1742.   

Own it and Love it.

(With thanks to 9x883 for the suggestion)

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On 21/06/2021 at 14:22, Dougall1 said:

I'm planning on keeping it long term 10 years plus in order to maximize it's value increase

I wouldn't set out to do that. It will not go lower than what you paid it, yet in 10 years you may have missed a spike in the market. I have a price in mind when I buy, and when I see that price I sell. Even if it goes higher later on, I will have reached my target. 

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