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Melting - without "pouring"?


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It seems the vast majority of DIY information is focused on "pouring", personally I'm not a fan of the poured aesthetic, recently I watched a video on documenting the process within a gold refinery in Rwanda, it shows the process of creating really smooth and clean bars by melting shot directly in the mold.

It has me wondering, why isn't this done more? Why is everybody "pouring"? Is there a caveat to the "melting directly in the mold" method which makes it only possible with specialise / industrial equipment?

Edited by B33TR00T
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I think the trick is to find a reusable mould and the equipment that goes with it to cope with the temperature. Can you post a link please of the Rwanda video. I have been experimenting a bit with tin (trying to creat a perfect bar) but the melting point is very low.

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1 hour ago, Bigmarc said:

I think the trick is to find a reusable mould and the equipment that goes with it to cope with the temperature. Can you post a link please of the Rwanda video. I have been experimenting a bit with tin (trying to creat a perfect bar) but the melting point is very low.

Here's the one I was talking about, but @FlorinCollectorposted a good one above too from Baird & Co.

So it seems there's 3 methods.

Pressed - these are the ultra perfect bars which are cut out from pressed sheets and then machine stamped.

Casted - these are shot/grain melted directly inside the mold to form the nice bar.

Poured - these are the ugly DIY ones that youtubers are selling with numismatic premiums.

 

Edited by B33TR00T
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@B33TR00T I think the cheapest way of getting the bars you want. I may be wrong would be to get a burnout furnace https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/burnout-furnace-18?code=F19541

Then put your gold shot into a mould and sit it in it

Edited by FlorinCollector
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You can get a very nice finish on poured silver. It all depends on who's making it and what they want it to look like. 

Here's a couple of poured pieces I've done. 

The bar is a bit under 1ozt. 

The heart shows it through the sanding stages. 

 

Screenshot_20210811-162239_Gallery.jpg

20210801_193135.jpg

www.fyldecoins.co.uk

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1 hour ago, Iacabu said:

You can get a very nice finish on poured silver. It all depends on who's making it and what they want it to look like. 

Here's a couple of poured pieces I've done. 

The bar is a bit under 1ozt. 

The heart shows it through the sanding stages. 

 

Screenshot_20210811-162239_Gallery.jpg

20210801_193135.jpg

Wow those are spectacular, I guess most of the people I see doing this on youtube are leaving theirs at your Heart(stage 2) with a light clean and polish.

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I could be wrong, so more research would be needed ,however to get the look and smoothness, the pure gold shot would need to be vacuum casted,

I think this can be done through induction, however probably you could use some enclosed furnace. 

This should leave your bar with the smooth cushion look. 

The exact amount is put into the mold/molds melted and then left to cool before being removed. 

Edited by Wampum
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2 hours ago, B33TR00T said:

Wow those are spectacular, I guess most of the people I see doing this on youtube are leaving theirs at your Heart(stage 2) with a light clean and polish.

Thanks.. Yeah, many pour in to a mould and maybe a quick clean up afterwards or an hour in a tumbler 

www.fyldecoins.co.uk

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3 hours ago, paulmerton said:

Pouring gives you an opportunity to skim off any slag or other impurities from the liquid metal before committing it to the mold. I can see that being an advantage if you're melting random bits of silver that may not be entirely pure or that have dirt engrained in crevices.

Hello Paul

Are there any benefits of making shot first before doing the final pour? 

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2 minutes ago, paulmerton said:

Lots of little bits will melt quicker than a big chunky bar would.

Cheers so it won't separate more or the slag and impurities. Just trying to work out if it's a pointless task.

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