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What happens with Commonwealth bullion when the monarch dies?


Bimetallic

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Hi all – Queen Elizabeth's reign began long before any of the modern bullion coins existed (she ascended in 1952). I was curious to know what to expect when the Queen passes, since we've never experienced such a change and she's 93 years old. Will the various Royal Mints (Britain, Canada, Australia) switch to King Charles' profile the very next calendar year? Will there be years of Queen commemoratives instead? I suppose whatever they do would apply to all coinage, not just bullion issues.

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The Queen probably has a fair bit of mileage left in her @Bimetallic and may well live past 100 years of age like her own mother did. Charles is over 70 himself so there's no guarantee that he'll outlive the Queen, but if he does, his own reign may be short. This isn't the first time this discussion has surfaced and I think your train of thought is correct in that the new Monarch should appear on the following year's coins, whether circulated, proofs or bullion. 

What should change is that the new Monarch will face the left side of the coins, whereas the Queen faces right. It alternates from Monarch to Monarch.

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The head of the Commonwealth isnt necessarily the British Monarch. This has just been tradition. You may remember that it was agreed by the various Commonwealth leaders last year that Prince Charles would be the next head so presumably he would be on the coinage once he ascends. 

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12 hours ago, goldmember44 said:

I think the newly minted coinage would immediately change to the head of the new monarch on the obverse, even halfway through the year. 

And then the clamber for the new KIng George VII Coins will have begun,especially first day specials at the most exorbitent prices, of course.with all the worlds Mints making a killing.

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I believe the protocol is current monarch remains even on new minted until the new monarch is crowned.  That can be a few months at least.  Then there are sittings and designs (i read Charles has refused to do sittings ahead of the event) that'll prolong the process. 

We can be sure there will be shed loads of commemorative issues. 

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20 hours ago, Coolsmp said:

The head of the Commonwealth isnt necessarily the British Monarch. This has just been tradition. You may remember that it was agreed by the various Commonwealth leaders last year that Prince Charles would be the next head so presumably he would be on the coinage once he ascends. 

The British Monarch is surely the ruler who appears on British coins irrespective of whoever is going to be future Heads of the British Commonwealth. If Mokgweetsi Masisi, the President of Botswana, had been elected as the next Head of the Commonwealth for example  (instead of Charles), rest assured that he won't suddenly be making an appearance on all our coins and taking over Buckingham Palace. 

 

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11 hours ago, Martlet said:

I believe the protocol is current monarch remains even on new minted until the new monarch is crowned.  That can be a few months at least.  Then there are sittings and designs (i read Charles has refused to do sittings ahead of the event) that'll prolong the process. 

We can be sure there will be shed loads of commemorative issues. 

Quite sure those in the know will already have some idea of how they will look. Almost to the point of which one do you like the most. Of course there is no guarantee Charles will use his first name, he can chose Charles, Phillip, Arthur or George.

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Perhaps someone from Canada or Australia can inform us differently but I've read those countries are likely to leave the commonwealth once Elizabeth II's reign has concluded. I hope that's not the case as I like tradition and think these countries should embrace their British heritage. As a collector it'd be a disaster as well because suddenly every Perth Mint/RCM bullion coin had either the mint logo or the coat of arms of that country on one side of the coin. I'd much rather have the monarch. Either way, once Charles ascends I'm buying as much Canadian and Australian bullion with his face on it due to their possible departure.

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Australia as with no doubt other Commonwealth countries has tossed the idea of becoming a republic around and ditching the monarch as Head of State.  So far, Australia has voted to retain the status quo, much to the disappointment of republicans.

It is unlikely that Australia will leave the Commonwealth on the passing of our current sovereign.

Of course, it begs the question that if ever Australia does decide to become a republic as to who would be Head of State. That conundrum has yet to be solved as no one really wants an elected Head of State as they can't decide if it should be a politician, a well known persona, a sportsperson, a military person or who exactly. 

As for the Coat of Arms, I guess that too would have to change as it currently is the Royal Coat of Arms. Without a monarch, they can hardly lay claim to a 'Royal' on their coins.

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Does anyone remember the television film Henry the ninth? I wouldn’t be at all surprised if what it predicted came true and Charles bows out in favour of his son.

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10 minutes ago, TonyS said:

Does anyone remember the television film Henry the ninth? I wouldn’t be at all surprised if what it predicted came true and Charles bows out in favour of his son.

If that was the case Tony, I doubt Charles would have gone to the bother of mixing with all of the Commonwealth leaders recently as well as with President Trump, if he was just going to drop out of his destined role. Having said that, he wouldn't be the first Royal to do so, would he?

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Just think of the money it would save the country. OK, eventually there would be two state funerals (Elizabeth & Charles) but only one coronation.

I wonder if Canada would let us borrow the original Queens Beasts?

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14 hours ago, AgCoyote said:

Perhaps someone from Canada or Australia can inform us differently but I've read those countries are likely to leave the commonwealth once Elizabeth II's reign has concluded. I hope that's not the case as I like tradition and think these countries should embrace their British heritage. As a collector it'd be a disaster as well because suddenly every Perth Mint/RCM bullion coin had either the mint logo or the coat of arms of that country on one side of the coin. I'd much rather have the monarch. Either way, once Charles ascends I'm buying as much Canadian and Australian bullion with his face on it due to their possible departure.

Although I've lived in the UK for 11 years I am a Canadian citizen and keep up with current affairs in Canada as much as those in the UK. I've never personally heard anything serious about Canada leaving the commonwealth or ditching the UK monarch as head of state. To do so would be a very long and complicated process as so much of the countries constitution, etc is tied up in the current system. Given that the current arrangement is more symbolic than anything there isn't really a need or desire to go through the complicated process of changing systems. There just isn't enough to be gained for the effort, expense, etc. In Canada's case at least this is the stuff of fantasy - I wouldn't worry about it happening.

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