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britannia gold coin question.


darrol

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Is the  Britannia gold coin up to  - 1989    the same alloy metal mix as a gold sovereign ?    I have a 1987 Britannia and it looks slightly cooper coloured a bit like the new gold sovereigns,  while 2000 and higher dates are more yellow gold . it just got me wondering as I don't know much about the Britannia  .

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Pure gold 24k is slightly reddish in colour. Since Sovereign, Kuggerand, Eagles are still on crown gold tradition of 22k, which is 91.7% pure gold and remaining traditionally copper or mix of copper & silver with ratio preferred by the mint. Yellow gold 18k which has lower percentage of  pure gold (75%) and higher percentage mix of copper & silver.

Indeed the colour chart is a linear fix percentage for the various shades of alloyed gold. The accuracy of the above colour chart versus the various mint preferred ratio of cooper & silver for their alloyed gold will not be exact in colour. An example, both rose gold and yellow gold contain the elements of gold, copper and silver. The ratio mix will determine which karat of alloyed gold it become. The final colour tone is also different because of that. And if we add in the minute traces of other metals contamination, what will it be for the correct shades of alloyed colour variety?

Charts are often used to ease understanding of large quantities of data and the relationships between parts of the data. Charts can usually be read more quickly than the raw data. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colored_gold

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crown_gold

‚ÄĚEach of us had something to learn from the others and something to teach in return‚ÄĚ

 

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3 hours ago, Au79 said:

Pure gold 24k is slightly reddish in colour. Since Sovereign, Kuggerand, Eagles are still on crown gold tradition of 22k, which is 91.7% pure gold and remaining traditionally copper or mix of copper & silver with ratio preferred by the mint. Yellow gold 18k which has lower percentage of  pure gold (75%) and higher percentage mix of copper & silver.

Indeed the colour chart is a linear fix percentage for the various shades of alloyed gold. The accuracy of the above colour chart versus the various mint preferred ratio of cooper & silver for their alloyed gold will not be exact in colour. An example, both rose gold and yellow gold contain the elements of gold, copper and silver. The ratio mix will determine which karat of alloyed gold it become. The final colour tone is also different because of that. And if we add in the minute traces of other metals contamination, what will it be for the correct shades of alloyed colour variety?

Charts are often used to ease understanding of large quantities of data and the relationships between parts of the data. Charts can usually be read more quickly than the raw data. 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colored_gold

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crown_gold

‚ÄĚEach of us had something to learn from the others and something to teach in return‚ÄĚ

 

I was referring to the Krugerrand which is supposed to be 22 carat, 91.67% gold with 8.33% copper.

That puts it near the top of the triangle which appears a lot more yellow on my monitor than the coin is in real life.

In real life the coin looks more like 70% according to that image.

Nice image but I question it's accuracy.

 

 

 

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With limited information provided on the coin’s provenance, it is realise that the cognitive dissonance between the gold red tone at the mint and the current yellow tone at storage is the reason for the inaccuracy of the alloyed gold colour chart.

7 hours ago, RoughDog said:

I was referring to the Krugerrand which is supposed to be 22 carat, 91.67% gold with 8.33% copper.

That puts it near the top of the triangle which appears a lot more yellow on my monitor than the coin is in real life.

In real life the coin looks more like 70% according to that image.

Nice image but I question it's accuracy.

 

 

 

https://www.goldengates.com/en/why-do-gold-coins-have-different-colours/

https://www.orobel.biz/information/news/fakes-counterfakes-krugerrand

 

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