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rare coins or bullion related coins?


blindguy

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Lately  I have been selling off my collector coins for more bullion related coins. An example is I own 25 1885, 1886 and 1912-s Liberty nickels so I decided to sell on Ebay all but three of them and take the money and buy coins such as gold lib's or sovereigns that trade just over their melt value. I am started to believe that some collector coins are losing value due to less and less people collecting coins. Some of the coins I am getting rid of are silver war nickels in ms67 or ms66, 1932 d&s Washington quarters, mint state Mercury dimes, key date lincoln cents, Barber half dollars like 1913, 1914, 1915. All of these coins have gone down the last few years  and I wonder if they will keep dropping in value. One type of collector coins I have high hope for a up swing are the proof minors in cameo from 1950-1964. Only 1% to 2% of all proofs in this time frame are cameo or deep cameo due to the way they made the die's at the U.S. mint. No sand blasting the dies  bake then just old fashion pickling just like they did in the 1800's. I do also like proof coins from the 1800's in cameo. So what do you think is the future of collector coins?

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45 minutes ago, blindguy said:

Lately  I have been selling off my collector coins for more bullion related coins. An example is I own 25 1885, 1886 and 1912-s Liberty nickels so I decided to sell on Ebay all but three of them and take the money and buy coins such as gold lib's or sovereigns that trade just over their melt value. I am started to believe that some collector coins are losing value due to less and less people collecting coins. Some of the coins I am getting rid of are silver war nickels in ms67 or ms66, 1932 d&s Washington quarters, mint state Mercury dimes, key date lincoln cents, Barber half dollars like 1913, 1914, 1915. All of these coins have gone down the last few years  and I wonder if they will keep dropping in value. One type of collector coins I have high hope for a up swing are the proof minors in cameo from 1950-1964. Only 1% to 2% of all proofs in this time frame are cameo or deep cameo due to the way they made the die's at the U.S. mint. No sand blasting the dies  bake then just old fashion pickling just like they did in the 1800's. I do also like proof coins from the 1800's in cameo. So what do you think is the future of collector coins?

Quality usually counts, premium matters during good times, perhaps now being a turbulent time people are not sure if they are in a pre bubble or not, the ten year cycle has long since passed which is never a good sign...I think like anything though, if your wanting to flip then any time can be a worry when based on short termism...I like older coins and know the costs are not cheap but a,so they tend to not be making higher grade old coins anymore, no stashes of a million capped, draped, flowing or liberties floating around...but if the value tied up has become a worry then yes, it's time to sell, your mental health is priority number one, sleepless nights aren't worth it.

 

if prices aren't growing when they are literally printing money based on nothing then I don't think the price is going to raise a lot, you need buyers to sell to..I'd say keep what you love, sell what you dont, only buy to hold and dont worry about the value, I know I don't worry about it...I have no ulcers but a nice colections of capped bust, cornishware, etc and I'm sure there will never be a big call for cornishware in the United States.

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I agree with you. I love bust coins and have 300 or so graded au50 or higher. I am not sure coins from 1890 thru  1950 are worth keeping in large numbers anymore. Years ago I bought brilliant proof Buffalo nickels and they have lost over half their value but I still will not sell them. I am not a fan of Morgan dollars, no longer own even one of them but I do like high grade Peace dollars. I also like 1892 O&S Barber half dollars. My wife and I thought if we buy Mercury dime again we would look for common dates in MS68. Right now we are working on proof Franklin's in high grades, 1950- 1953 in proof 67 cameo or 68 cameo and 1954-1963 in proof 69.  Sorry if I rambled on as I love to talk coins and around here no one to talk coins with.   Jim

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 I have been gradually selling bullion coins in favor of collector coins.  I have noticed American collector coin prices have been under a fair amount of pressure.  On the other hand the American collector coin market is fairly cyclical. The problem is that rarity is difficult to find unless one looks at the very highest level of the American coin market. 

Your strategy of looking for cameo proofs is a good one but this is very important to only buy at the very highest level for long-term investment.  The spread on collect the coins is usually much larger than him pull in so short termism is a bad thing and flipability ability is almost zero.

 Here in the UK, I have noticed that the very very best is rapidly rising in price particularly older proofs,  gothic crowns  and very very good earlier material.  Very common or bad condition material has a diminishing market.

 Very high-quality world coins are still incredibly cheap compared to their USA equivalents which are fairly dramatically overpriced in some areas.

 Buy what you enjoy owning and keep it for a minimum of 5 to 10 years.

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Good advise from numistacker. My wife and I love high grade proof cameo's and we never sell the early bust or proof coins but years ago we stuck away a lot of lower grade key date coins, such as 1909-s vdb and others. These coins in lower grades are going down in value. It might be a good buy at this time to buy the key dates and just sit on them for 10 to 20 years but I am 60 years old and do not think in long terms anymore. Right now I want quality over quantity in my collection.

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16 minutes ago, blindguy said:

Good advise from numistacker. My wife and I love high grade proof cameo's and we never sell the early bust or proof coins but years ago we stuck away a lot of lower grade key date coins, such as 1909-s vdb and others. These coins in lower grades are going down in value. It might be a good buy at this time to buy the key dates and just sit on them for 10 to 20 years but I am 60 years old and do not think in long terms anymore. Right now I want quality over quantity in my collection.

I'm not a fan of having so much of any high quality enough to poster your entire room...a dozen great beats a hundred so so.

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