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2023 Silver Yale of Beaufort Two Ounce Bullion Coin - Photos


LawrenceChard

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19 hours ago, DrDave said:

Nice snaps! 😂 (which is the most annoying thing to say to a photographer!)

I haven't even opened my bullion Yales yet, although i did take a pic of the proof.......

Yale.jpg

How does one get that flat effect off a shiny silver coin?

The Sovereign is the quintessentially British coin.  It has a German queen on the front, an Italian waiter on the back, and half of them were made in Australia.

 

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37 minutes ago, Silverlocks said:

How does one get that flat effect off a shiny silver coin?

The field of the coin is the reflective part (as you know), and its angled in such a way that the reflection is of a diffuse white surface, which happens to be my light!

Some people prefer to have a small, darker area to show that the coin is reflective

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23 hours ago, Silverlocks said:

How does one get that flat effect off a shiny silver coin?

 

22 hours ago, DrDave said:

The field of the coin is the reflective part (as you know), and its angled in such a way that the reflection is of a diffuse white surface, which happens to be my light!

Some people prefer to have a small, darker area to show that the coin is reflective

If you shoot "head on", you get different, usually unwanted effects, unless you know how to avoid them...

...but DrDave does!

Chards

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On 27/09/2022 at 17:45, DrDave said:

The field of the coin is the reflective part (as you know), and its angled in such a way that the reflection is of a diffuse white surface, which happens to be my light!

Some people prefer to have a small, darker area to show that the coin is reflective

 

On 28/09/2022 at 16:22, LawrenceChard said:

If you shoot "head on", you get different, usually unwanted effects, unless you know how to avoid them...

...but DrDave does!

Head on shot of a two ounce silver bullion version:

2023YaleofBeaufortTudorBeasts1ozSilverProofCoinReverseCROP.thumb.jpg.328f2023fb6ff3a253633d158b92a3b2.jpg

Reverse above, and obverse:

2023YaleofBeaufortTudorBeasts1ozSilverProofCoinObverseCROP.thumb.jpg.bf3f93025ab13fef200cbe4c6a9b5af5.jpg

Who thinks we should have counted the serrations?

😎

Edited by LawrenceChard

Chards

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2 minutes ago, Darr3nG said:

Paging @HerefordBullyun...

Happy to donate. and a bag of world winning manure - make ya rhubarb awesome

Central bankers are politicians disguised as economists or bankers. They’re either incompetent or liars. So, either way, you’re never going to get a valid answer.” - Peter Schiff

Sound money is not a guarantee of a free society, but a free society is impossible without sound money. We are currently a society enslaved by debt.
 
If you are a new member and want to know why we stack PMs look at this link https://www.thesilverforum.com/topic/56131-videos-of-significance/#comment-381454
 
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Is there a resource anywhere which has information specifically about the edges & rims of coins?

I'm interested in the history of how they were developed & what they have looked like on UK coins over time, so I can incorporate them into something I'm making, but nobody seems to care about the poor edges or rims.

Asked the Royal Mint about where I could find images of what the edges looked like on the original coins from back when Isaac Newton started his war against counterfeiters, so 1699 -1727 initially, but as ever their answer was 'dunno'. 

I only seem to find images of the fronts & backs of coins.

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5 minutes ago, Essendie said:

Is there a resource anywhere which has information specifically about the edges & rims of coins?

I'm interested in the history of how they were developed & what they have looked like on UK coins over time, so I can incorporate them into something I'm making, but nobody seems to care about the poor edges or rims.

Asked the Royal Mint about where I could find images of what the edges looked like on the original coins from back when Isaac Newton started his war against counterfeiters, so 1699 -1727 initially, but as ever their answer was 'dunno'. 

I only seem to find images of the fronts & backs of coins.

It's funny but the third side is often ignored, at least on British coins.

Ironically, I never noticed this until I got fascinated by Imperial Russian coinage - the wealth of description and images in their catalogues of the edges puts ours to shame.

Edited by SidS
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I have coins dating back to Charles II - early milled shillings up to and including 1787 before the Great Recoinage of 1816.

So do some other members on here.

The edge on most of these coins is a milled edge but at an angle, rather than perpendicular to the face of the coin as it is on later issues.

I think this is also the case on the copper coins - I don't have as many, but I do have a 1721 George I halfpenny and the 1797-1799 copper farthing, halfpenny, penny and twopence plus the 1806/07 halfpenny and penny.  

The cartwheel coins (1797 penny and twopence) have a smooth edge.

I like the crowns with edge lettering - George III, George IV and Victoria issues, and then the 1935 Rocking Horse coin as well.  I have an 1820, 1845 and 1895 but not a George IV coin.

Of the decimal coins, the £2 is often quite interesting with regard to edge lettering, especially the commemorative circulating coins.

Lots to enjoy on the edges 😉

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On 29/09/2022 at 22:20, LawrenceChard said:

 

Head on shot of a one ounce silver proof:

2023YaleofBeaufortTudorBeasts1ozSilverProofCoinReverseCROP.thumb.jpg.328f2023fb6ff3a253633d158b92a3b2.jpg

Reverse above, and obverse:

2023YaleofBeaufortTudorBeasts1ozSilverProofCoinObverseCROP.thumb.jpg.bf3f93025ab13fef200cbe4c6a9b5af5.jpg

Who thinks we should have counted the serrations?

😎

That’s the 2oz silver bullion.

I much prefer the background on the reverse of the bullion Tudor Beasts in comparison to the proof version.

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On 29/09/2022 at 22:20, LawrenceChard said:

 

Head on shot of a one ounce silver proof:

2023YaleofBeaufortTudorBeasts1ozSilverProofCoinReverseCROP.thumb.jpg.328f2023fb6ff3a253633d158b92a3b2.jpg

Reverse above, and obverse:

2023YaleofBeaufortTudorBeasts1ozSilverProofCoinObverseCROP.thumb.jpg.bf3f93025ab13fef200cbe4c6a9b5af5.jpg

Who thinks we should have counted the serrations?

😎

These pics are of the 2oz bullion, and not the 1oz proof…

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3 hours ago, Foster88 said:

That’s the 2oz silver bullion.

I much prefer the background on the reverse of the bullion Tudor Beasts in comparison to the proof version.

Thanks for the correction!

😎

1 hour ago, DrDave said:

These pics are of the 2oz bullion, and not the 1oz proof…

Thanks for the correction!

😎

Chards

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On 01/10/2022 at 19:16, Stuntman said:

I have coins dating back to Charles II - early milled shillings up to and including 1787 before the Great Recoinage of 1816.

So do some other members on here.

The edge on most of these coins is a milled edge but at an angle, rather than perpendicular to the face of the coin as it is on later issues.

I think this is also the case on the copper coins - I don't have as many, but I do have a 1721 George I halfpenny and the 1797-1799 copper farthing, halfpenny, penny and twopence plus the 1806/07 halfpenny and penny.  

The cartwheel coins (1797 penny and twopence) have a smooth edge.

I like the crowns with edge lettering - George III, George IV and Victoria issues, and then the 1935 Rocking Horse coin as well.  I have an 1820, 1845 and 1895 but not a George IV coin.

Of the decimal coins, the £2 is often quite interesting with regard to edge lettering, especially the commemorative circulating coins.

Lots to enjoy on the edges 😉

Oooooooooh.
If your camera happens to trip & fall into taking any photos of them to show angles/edges etc... hope you post them in the forum.

Don't think they'll be in my budget til after Christmas best case & more likely Easter.

The coins in my wallet are mostly older than any of the ones I have purchased so far.
Only started collecting last Dec.

I do have that Tudor Beast 2oz bullion coin upstairs though & I WILL count the serrations, but I think it's a pretty poor show on behalf of the Royal Mint not to put all those sort of specs on the product pages.
It's not like they don't know!

Even Backyard Bullion flashed a bit of edge on his You Tube video with the 1kg Bull & Bear coin earlier.😁 (5mins 15 seconds in, I saw that)
 

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