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Date Run Buying Strategy


DrDave

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So what the strategy for buying/collecting date runs or a particular monarch?

Do you start with one of the end dates? Or the easiest, the one with the highest mintage? Or just whatever best deal comes up?

So with Victoria Sovereign for instance there's a lot of years to monitor, different heads, various mints. Where to begin...........?

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I try to do the exact opposite of what every person says you should do.

The common logic is to start with the cheaper and easier coins. Get the momentum rolling and leave the rare/scarce ones for last. Perhaps this is wise, as maybe the common dates all go up in price a little over time, whereas the rarer ones may not. So leaving them until last may cost more in the long run?

However, I would favour getting the rarer dates/key dates first. Firstly, because they're tougher to acquire, quite often they go up in price more noticeably over time. Secondly, if you lose interest in completing a date set and decide to do something different, you could use them as part of a type set, or just hold them as key dates.

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31 minutes ago, DrDave said:

Do you look for a particular grade for the rarer coins, or just what you can find with the potential to replace it if a better one comes along?

 

Both. It really depends how rare the coin is, or how much demand there is.

Condition is one of the hardest things to get right sometimes.

Everyone will tell you (and rightly) that the best condition coin (so long as it is priced fairly) is the way to go.

However, if you're talking big money coins like the 1841 sovereign, imagine that in EF/AU grades, then sometimes the buying market for such premium coins is really small because they're just so far beyond most people's budgets that they either: can never afford it OR choose to purposely exclude it and wouldn't even buy it if the funds fell into their pockets, because they'd never want to spend so much on a coin, period.

Therefore sometimes rare/key date coins can stagnate price wise.

The lower grade key dates can sometimes turn a better profit. For example I wish I'd bought an Ansell sovereign when they were about £200-£250 a pop (common garden shields being a mere £120). But I went with the common coins and ended up priced out of the market for the rare ones. I could never afford an Ansell now, that boat has sailed.

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Personally I see little point in trying to make a date run of coins where (a) some will be near impossible to source / cost a fortune and (b) where there are gaps in the years for that particular coin. Sovereigns would be an example. I started this with half sovereigns then gave up after losing interest, especially when you see so many variants with the older coins.

Much more satisfying is to build a complete date run of cheaper and maybe coins that have a different reverse each year ( but not always ).

As an example the silver Australian Kookaburras is a nice set.
Perth Mint Lunars.
The Royal Australian Mint ( RAM ) silver kangaroos - beautiful but the set ended a couple of years ago.
Silver Britannias nice but a few repetitive designs.
Chinese Pandas but from which year to start as earlier coins are seriously expensive.

Aside from date runs many collectors are drawn to series like the Queens Beasts and now the Tudor Beasts.
These coins are minted in gold, silver and platinum and some have multiple weights - silver 2oz, 10oz and 1kg for example.
You can probably buy a complete 2oz silver QB set ( I saw a set for sale recently on the forum ) but you may gain more satisfaction building your own set so buy the Tudor Lion whilst it is readily available still and the Yale is shipping this week.
 

 

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1 minute ago, Pete said:

Personally I see little point in trying to make a date run of coins where (a) some will be near impossible to source / cost a fortune and (b) where there are gaps in the years for that particular coin. Sovereigns would be an example. I started this with half sovereigns then gave up after losing interest, especially when you see so many variants with the older coins.

Much more satisfying is to build a complete date run of cheaper and maybe coins that have a different reverse each year ( but not always ).

As an example the silver Australian Kookaburras is a nice set.
Perth Mint Lunars.
The Royal Australian Mint ( RAM ) silver kangaroos - beautiful but the set ended a couple of years ago.
Silver Britannias nice but a few repetitive designs.
Chinese Pandas but from which year to start as earlier coins are seriously expensive.

Aside from date runs many collectors are drawn to series like the Queens Beasts and now the Tudor Beasts.
These coins are minted in gold, silver and platinum and some have multiple weights - silver 2oz, 10oz and 1kg for example.
You can probably buy a complete 2oz silver QB set ( I saw a set for sale recently on the forum ) but you may gain more satisfaction building your own set so buy the Tudor Lion whilst it is readily available still and the Yale is shipping this week.
 

 

I'm particularly looking at Sovereigns on this occasion. I realise that some (if i work on Queen Victoria's) will be impossible or very expensive to find, but i was really just interested in general strategy. 

I'll probably end up pipcking up the most affordable and then filling in the gaps. 

For modern silver, i'm concentrating on proofs, som should be relatively easy to put the sets together, indeed as you suggest the Queens and Tudor Beasts. I did actually buy a complete set of 2oz bullion Queens Beast, and there was no satisfaction at all of having a set! I'm feeling that silver bullion isn't what i'mreally interested in, and so have already started to sell them on.

Thanks for your comments and suggestions though. Very useful

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15 minutes ago, DrDave said:

I'm particularly looking at Sovereigns on this occasion. I realise that some (if i work on Queen Victoria's) will be impossible or very expensive to find, but i was really just interested in general strategy. 

I'll probably end up pipcking up the most affordable and then filling in the gaps. 

For modern silver, i'm concentrating on proofs, som should be relatively easy to put the sets together, indeed as you suggest the Queens and Tudor Beasts. I did actually buy a complete set of 2oz bullion Queens Beast, and there was no satisfaction at all of having a set! I'm feeling that silver bullion isn't what i'mreally interested in, and so have already started to sell them on.

Thanks for your comments and suggestions though. Very useful

Good luck !!!
I was drawn into the sheer beauty and quality of silver proofs and built quite a collection myself.
Years later though I found selling unwanted proofs at a fair price very difficult and I lost money on most.
I had a few commemorative proof sets, mainly Canadian Olympic e.g., and was horrified to see the dreaded milk spots appearing on many sealed coins.
Spots and blemishes were destroying the cosmetic perfection so I decided to dump everything I had that was proof and take my losses on the chin. The only proof silver I have today are a few boxed Britannia sets. The older ones are now starting to tone caused I think by the Royal Mint black ring inside the capsules because the degree of toning is worst on the smallest coins. Bright mirrored silver turning dull coppery is not appealing to me in a pristine set.

I do regret however selling my boxed proof silver American Eagles as prices have risen significantly for some dates but any spotting on these would definitely have impacted their sheer beauty.
 

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14 hours ago, DrDave said:

So what the strategy for buying/collecting date runs or a particular monarch?

Do you start with one of the end dates? Or the easiest, the one with the highest mintage? Or just whatever best deal comes up?

So with Victoria Sovereign for instance there's a lot of years to monitor, different heads, various mints. Where to begin...........?

Whatever best deal comes up.

Make life easier, not harder.

😎

Chards

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