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New Testing Equipment: GVS Bullion Tester


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I recently purchased the GVS Bullion Tester from GVS Bullion Group based in Austria.   While I do have the Sigma Metalytics PMV Pro Mini, I always firmly believed that no one testing equipment or method is perfect.  If you can throw a battery of tests at a precious metal in question and it passes each one, then you can be very confident that the PM you have in your hand is genuine.  

What I liked about the GVS Bullion Tester is that it shares one feature with the Sigma - it can test through packaging or capsules like the Sigma.  This advantage (among others) is what caught my interest and helped me to pull the trigger on getting one.

When UPS delivered my order to me, I was surprised to see how big the box was.  Upon closer inspection, it is actually two smaller boxes taped together.   The first box contained the scale, and the second box contained a powerful magnet.  Both items were carefully wrapped and placed in a styrofoam tray; both items were protected with a massive amount of peanut foam packaging to protect it from shipping damage.   I give 10/10 to GVS for really going over and beyond for their packaging!

The scale is super easy to use.  Instructions are succinct and to the point.  Some easy assembly is required (just follow the instructions) and let the scale sit for a minimum of 12 hours for the springs in the scale to settle.  Turn the power on and wait for it to cycle through, which takes a few seconds.   Then Tare the display to zero and start testing the precious metals.   Compare digital readout display to GVS PM charts and see the range for what you are testing for.   If it is within range, it is genuine.   If it is fake, it will throw a very high negative value as well as having an extremely strong pull from the scale's magnet.    

When combining the Sigma and the GVS scale to test precious metals, I am 99% confident of the test results and the authenticity of the precious metal in question.   Next to the Sigma, the GVS Bullion Tester is a significant piece of equipment that works as described.  It is well built and and does what it claims.   I have tested a few fakes in my possession and it caught them all.  

My purchase price for the GVS Bullion Tester was 805 Euros + 45.90 Euros for expedited shipping (which is approximately $1,296.10 Canadian dollars, which I charged to my MasterCard).  Import brokerage charges and taxes came to $72.14 Canadian dollars.   Total cost landed came to $1,368.24 Canadian dollars.    Edit: GVS has increased the price of this unit from the time I bought it.  This magnetic scale is now selling at 966 Euros + shipping, as per their website.

For more information on the GVS Bullion Tester, see the link below:

 

GVS Bullion | Test Devices (gvs-bullion.com)

 

Here are some pictures of the GVS Bullion Tester...

GVS1.thumb.jpg.d0e906ea12be916a2931a3e6f633b993.jpg

GVS2.thumb.jpg.699e640b4b5252efdc2c6f657958be6d.jpg

GVS3.thumb.jpg.f11e1c94fbb6731dc6ddc158aac96bb3.jpg

GVS4.thumb.jpg.23251b36abb5cd8628574b6d713d3cd8.jpg

GVS5.thumb.jpg.86dfe9ee5a5b7a3a0a2a2a0e64887896.jpg

GVS6.thumb.jpg.ba41ec5dfa3c1eb997bffa62b828fb3d.jpg

 

Conclusions:

After testing the GVS Bullion Tester, I personally feel that it is a good piece of equipment that can help you to detect fakes and validate your PM.  This equipment is not for everyone.  You'll need to be a serious stacker and/or collector in order to take advantage of this useful equipment.  If you are only buying several ounces of PM, your best bet would be to get your local bullion dealer to authenticate your PM.   If you can only afford to buy one test equipment and money is an issue, the GVS Bullion Tester would be my first choice over the Sigma.   Not saying the Sigma is bad, but if you are looking for reliable but lowest price testing equipment, the GVS Bullion Tester wins hands down.  If you are in the market for new testing equipment, I hope this review helps you decide.

Pros:

1) Can test through capsules and packaging like the Sigma

2) Cost of purchase is approximately 50% cheaper than my Sigma PMV Pro Mini (at time of writing)

3) Can detect fakes that the Sigma failed to pick up

4) Can test a stack of bullion coins or individually

5) A PM's magnetism can't be faked, making this a perfect tool 

6) Comes with a universal AC power adapter plug that works anywhere worldwide (make sure to inquire and request one that fits and works specifically for your country)

7) Can be combined with other testing methodologies to (double or triple) confirm the authenticity of a PM 

Cons:

1) It is still relatively expensive to buy when compared to other testing methodologies

2) You cannot use the magnetic scale near metallic objects (minimum distance required from metal objects is 3.28 feet, or 1 meter)

3) You need to "Tare" the scale every time you test a new PM.

4) Magnetic scale is a sensitive piece of equipment, and therefore caution is needed for proper handling, use, and storage

 

 

 

Edited by SilverStorm
Added Conclusion, Pro & Con
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In my first PM testing of the GVS scale, I used a 1 oz Krugerrand gold coin.  This gold coin has a metal composition of 91.67% Au, and 8.33% Cu.   Using the Sigma PMV Pro Mini, the Krugerrand showed a resistivity of 10.12 and the arrow is in the green band.   The Sigma confirms the Krugerrand is genuine.   The secondary test with the GVS Bullion Tester showed a value of 0.024.   When we look at the GVS chart for the Krugerrand, the range of acceptability is -0.128 to 0.040.  The tested value is within range, and the Krugerrand is considered genuine.   By combining the two test results, I am very confident that the Krugerrand is genuine.  

 

  Krug-Pro_Mini_Tested.thumb.jpg.5a6ac5ccbdf1aa17948408354448b059.jpg

Krug-GVS_Tested.thumb.jpg.fc45a89c9ef2fc5bab6450239a7ba9da.jpg

GVS-Target_Values_for_Gold_Coins_1_of_2.PDF

Edited by SilverStorm
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You may have noticed that the GVS scale is sitting on the floor when I took the picture.   One potential drawback of this testing equipment is that you cannot have any metallic objects within 1 meter (or 3.28 feet) of the scale, as the closeness of metallic objects will skew the test results.  Also, electronic devices, cardiac pacemakers and other life support devices should not be present when using this magnetic scale.   

As I mentioned in my previous post, the magnet is extremely strong and will pull anything that is magnetic towards it if it is close enough.  I could not use the scale on my dining table, as the under table support is made of metal.   When I tried testing, the results were skewed.   But when I moved the scale away from the table and onto the floor, the test results were within specified norms.

Secondly, this scale must sit perfectly flat.  To that end you need to adjust the feet of the scale so that the bubble is dead centre.  

Edited by SilverStorm
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Nice bit of kit!

At what point do you think these devices earn their money? For example, if I held 5 ounces of gold, would it be sensible to pay that much for a device to test what I have?

I guess it's like an insurance policy, you hope it never finds an anomaly but if it does, it could save you £$s.... but only then would it pay for itself.

Technically, alcohol is a solution..

'It [socialism] poses a growing threat, however unintentional, to the freedom of this country, for there is no freedom where the State totally controls the economy. Personal freedom and economic freedom are indivisible. You can’t have one without the other. You can’t lose one without losing the other.'

"There is no such thing as public money, there is only taxpayers' money"

"Lenin is certainly right. There is no subtler or more severe means of overturning the existing basis of society (destroy capitalism) than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and it does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose."

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1 minute ago, Roy said:

Nice bit of kit!

At what point do you think these devices earn their money? For example, if I held 5 ounces of gold, would it be sensible to pay that much for a device to test what I have?

I guess it's like an insurance policy, you hope it never finds an anomaly but if it does, it could save you £$s.... but only then would it pay for itself.

if you are a serious stacker, then the equipment becomes mandatory IMHO.   Of course, it may not make sense buying these expensive machines if you only plan on holding 5 ounces of gold.   In your case, you could get your local coin shop that you frequent to independently test the coins for authenticity.   

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Yes, I hear you.

I just wondered at what level does one become a 'serious' stacker?

Technically, alcohol is a solution..

'It [socialism] poses a growing threat, however unintentional, to the freedom of this country, for there is no freedom where the State totally controls the economy. Personal freedom and economic freedom are indivisible. You can’t have one without the other. You can’t lose one without losing the other.'

"There is no such thing as public money, there is only taxpayers' money"

"Lenin is certainly right. There is no subtler or more severe means of overturning the existing basis of society (destroy capitalism) than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and it does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose."

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1 minute ago, Roy said:

Yes, I hear you.

I just wondered at what level does one become a 'serious' stacker?

IMHO...testing equipment becomes necessary if any one of the conditions apply to you:

1) you plan on continuing to buy and hold precious metals in significant quantities for the indefinite future

2) you plan on buying and selling precious metals as a hobby or business 

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My second testing of the GVS scale involves the much beloved Sovereigns.    I tested two Sovereigns; the Sovereigns' composition consists of 0.917 Au, and 0.083 Cu or other metals.   The Sigma Pro Mini showed the Sovereigns with a resistivity of 10.09 and the arrow in the green band.  Sigma confirms authenticity for both.   I then tested the Sovereigns using the GVS scale.   The first Sovereign checked in at exactly 0.000, and the second Sovereign checked in at 0.005.  Unfortunately, the GVS chart does not show values for the small Sovereign coin, only for the 1 lb and half lb Sovereigns.   But if we use the target values provided for both (-0.012 to 0.011 & -0.010 to 0.009 respectively), we can see the tested values fall within both ranges.  We can conclude that both coins are considered genuine.  

Sov-Sigma_Tested.thumb.jpg.67604b0bfc12033055d308a10bfb16a2.jpg

Sov-GVS_Test_1.thumb.jpg.8124050e5f192a855613454f7a01f095.jpg

Sov-GVS_Test_1.5.thumb.jpg.f3fee4e9907d4c5431d8e2823e0e12ac.jpg

Sov-GVS_Test_2.thumb.jpg.2d08ffb01a97601650c3e79996acc536.jpg

GVS-Target_Values_Gold_Coins_Other_Weights.PDF

Edited by SilverStorm
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Why does the sovereign measure 45mm diameter and weigh 1oz?

26 minutes ago, SilverStorm said:

We can conclude that both coins are considered genuine.  

Are you sure?

Technically, alcohol is a solution..

'It [socialism] poses a growing threat, however unintentional, to the freedom of this country, for there is no freedom where the State totally controls the economy. Personal freedom and economic freedom are indivisible. You can’t have one without the other. You can’t lose one without losing the other.'

"There is no such thing as public money, there is only taxpayers' money"

"Lenin is certainly right. There is no subtler or more severe means of overturning the existing basis of society (destroy capitalism) than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and it does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose."

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3 minutes ago, Roy said:

Why does the sovereign measure 45mm diameter and weigh 1oz?

Are you sure?

I may have forgotten to zero out the Krugerrand input I had entered (I inputted 1 oz gold as PM weight), but the Sigma test results in terms of resistivity values should be correct for the Sovereigns.   

Edited by SilverStorm
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45mm?

The thing with science is you have to be consistent.

Technically, alcohol is a solution..

'It [socialism] poses a growing threat, however unintentional, to the freedom of this country, for there is no freedom where the State totally controls the economy. Personal freedom and economic freedom are indivisible. You can’t have one without the other. You can’t lose one without losing the other.'

"There is no such thing as public money, there is only taxpayers' money"

"Lenin is certainly right. There is no subtler or more severe means of overturning the existing basis of society (destroy capitalism) than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and it does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose."

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2 minutes ago, Roy said:

45mm?

The thing with science is you have to be consistent.

The Sigma is consistent; if the Sovereign was 1 oz, the measured diameter would be approximately 45 mm.   The fact that I may have forgotten to zero out the Krugerrand input is user error, not the machine.  

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Correct. 

Technically, alcohol is a solution..

'It [socialism] poses a growing threat, however unintentional, to the freedom of this country, for there is no freedom where the State totally controls the economy. Personal freedom and economic freedom are indivisible. You can’t have one without the other. You can’t lose one without losing the other.'

"There is no such thing as public money, there is only taxpayers' money"

"Lenin is certainly right. There is no subtler or more severe means of overturning the existing basis of society (destroy capitalism) than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and it does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose."

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And here we have an example where multiple testing methodologies becomes important.   Case in point: a British Columbia commemorative coin I inherited from my father.   This coin tests genuine for sterling silver on the Sigma, but it failed on the GVS scale.   Not withstanding the large negative value on the GVS display, the magnetic scale exerted an extremely strong force on the coin.  In fact, it took the coin right out of my hand as I was about to place it on the scale.  This proved that the commemorative coin is not sterling silver at all.   The Sigma (for whatever reason) was fooled.  The only explanation is either user error (I didn't choose the right test settings) or Sigma limitation when testing coins of this type and composition.  This is the main reason why I chose to buy the GVS scale, in order to supplement and verify all testing that is done.  

 

BC_Comm1.thumb.jpg.84de4d4e76e74f6f265a39e6c213dbb9.jpg

BC_Comm2.thumb.jpg.87426670425b036b9b5be7cdf7abd2d1.jpg

BC_Comm3.thumb.jpg.530a02436a94e148c56a1e98541b3aa2.jpg

BC_Comm4.thumb.jpg.cffb46cf26246cb5207197f617da6f58.jpg

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22 hours ago, SilverStorm said:

Case in point: a British Columbia commemorative coin I inherited from my father.   This coin tests genuine for sterling silver on the Sigma, but it failed on the GVS scale.   Not withstanding the large negative value on the GVS display, the magnetic scale exerted an extremely strong force on the coin.  In fact, it took the coin right out of my hand as I was about to place it on the scale.  This proved that the commemorative coin is not sterling silver at all.   The Sigma (for whatever reason) was fooled.  The only explanation is either user error (I didn't choose the right test settings) or Sigma limitation when testing coins of this type and composition.  This is the main reason why I chose to buy the GVS scale, in order to supplement and verify all testing that is done.  

I wish I could find the video I recently saw where the edge of a (silver eagle??) had magnetic attraction but not the centre of the coin. The coin tested as 999 silver in various tests except for the magnet test. Personally I would run a mile if a rare earth magnet stuck to the outside of a "silver coin" but the guy in the video seemed convinced it was because the coin had been mounted as an item of jewellery which explained why it was only magnetic on the rim. It made me scratch my head in disbelief but now I'am wondering if your inherited coin has any marks that might indicate it has also been mounted in some way? I think it was silver dragons who made the video but not 100% sure.

Nice thread BTW, always something new to learn.

What if I told you...

There is no "cloud" it's someone else's computer!

Government is the only Religion you can't opt out of!

The "money" which controls every aspect of your life is counterfeit! 

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The other test for sterling apart from a specific gravity test would be a ping test where the coin in question will almost ring like a bell, sterling pings better than 999

What if I told you...

There is no "cloud" it's someone else's computer!

Government is the only Religion you can't opt out of!

The "money" which controls every aspect of your life is counterfeit! 

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  • 4 months later...

Sorry to revive an old thread but I am looking for a tester for ancient gold coins.  In particular, composition of the coin.   Is the GVS suitable for this?  I see they provide acceptable ranges for a list of coins in their documentation anbd of course this will not cover the wide range of hammered ancients.

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Sigma is probably your best bet if you are testing really old coins.  While the GVS is good, it's suitability is for modern day bullion.  You throw in an ancient coin on the GVS, you won't know if the values given is correct or not.  With a Sigma, you'll know right away if the tested coin is within bounds (or out of bounds) of acceptability.  

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  • 6 months later...
On 23/11/2021 at 01:57, SilverStorm said:

I recently purchased the GVS Bullion Tester from GVS Bullion Group based in Austria.   While I do have the Sigma Metalytics PMV Pro Mini, I always firmly believed that no one testing equipment or method is perfect.  If you can throw a battery of tests at a precious metal in question and it passes each one, then you can be very confident that the PM you have in your hand is genuine.  

What I liked about the GVS Bullion Tester is that it shares one feature with the Sigma - it can test through packaging or capsules like the Sigma.  This advantage (among others) is what caught my interest and helped me to pull the trigger on getting one.

When UPS delivered my order to me, I was surprised to see how big the box was.  Upon closer inspection, it is actually two smaller boxes taped together.   The first box contained the scale, and the second box contained a powerful magnet.  Both items were carefully wrapped and placed in a styrofoam tray; both items were protected with a massive amount of peanut foam packaging to protect it from shipping damage.   I give 10/10 to GVS for really going over and beyond for their packaging!

The scale is super easy to use.  Instructions are succinct and to the point.  Some easy assembly is required (just follow the instructions) and let the scale sit for a minimum of 12 hours for the springs in the scale to settle.  Turn the power on and wait for it to cycle through, which takes a few seconds.   Then Tare the display to zero and start testing the precious metals.   Compare digital readout display to GVS PM charts and see the range for what you are testing for.   If it is within range, it is genuine.   If it is fake, it will throw a very high negative value as well as having an extremely strong pull from the scale's magnet.    

When combining the Sigma and the GVS scale to test precious metals, I am 99% confident of the test results and the authenticity of the precious metal in question.   Next to the Sigma, the GVS Bullion Tester is a significant piece of equipment that works as described.  It is well built and and does what it claims.   I have tested a few fakes in my possession and it caught them all.  

My purchase price for the GVS Bullion Tester was 805 Euros + 45.90 Euros for expedited shipping (which is approximately $1,296.10 Canadian dollars, which I charged to my MasterCard).  Import brokerage charges and taxes came to $72.14 Canadian dollars.   Total cost landed came to $1,368.24 Canadian dollars.    Edit: GVS has increased the price of this unit from the time I bought it.  This magnetic scale is now selling at 966 Euros + shipping, as per their website.

For more information on the GVS Bullion Tester, see the link below:

 

GVS Bullion | Test Devices (gvs-bullion.com)

 

Here are some pictures of the GVS Bullion Tester...

GVS1.thumb.jpg.d0e906ea12be916a2931a3e6f633b993.jpg

GVS2.thumb.jpg.699e640b4b5252efdc2c6f657958be6d.jpg

GVS3.thumb.jpg.f11e1c94fbb6731dc6ddc158aac96bb3.jpg

GVS4.thumb.jpg.23251b36abb5cd8628574b6d713d3cd8.jpg

GVS5.thumb.jpg.86dfe9ee5a5b7a3a0a2a2a0e64887896.jpg

GVS6.thumb.jpg.ba41ec5dfa3c1eb997bffa62b828fb3d.jpg

 

Conclusions:

After testing the GVS Bullion Tester, I personally feel that it is a good piece of equipment that can help you to detect fakes and validate your PM.  This equipment is not for everyone.  You'll need to be a serious stacker and/or collector in order to take advantage of this useful equipment.  If you are only buying several ounces of PM, your best bet would be to get your local bullion dealer to authenticate your PM.   If you can only afford to buy one test equipment and money is an issue, the GVS Bullion Tester would be my first choice over the Sigma.   Not saying the Sigma is bad, but if you are looking for reliable but lowest price testing equipment, the GVS Bullion Tester wins hands down.  If you are in the market for new testing equipment, I hope this review helps you decide.

Pros:

1) Can test through capsules and packaging like the Sigma

2) Cost of purchase is approximately 50% cheaper than my Sigma PMV Pro Mini (at time of writing)

3) Can detect fakes that the Sigma failed to pick up

4) Can test a stack of bullion coins or individually

5) A PM's magnetism can't be faked, making this a perfect tool 

6) Comes with a universal AC power adapter plug that works anywhere worldwide (make sure to inquire and request one that fits and works specifically for your country)

7) Can be combined with other testing methodologies to (double or triple) confirm the authenticity of a PM 

Cons:

1) It is still relatively expensive to buy when compared to other testing methodologies

2) You cannot use the magnetic scale near metallic objects (minimum distance required from metal objects is 3.28 feet, or 1 meter)

3) You need to "Tare" the scale every time you test a new PM.

4) Magnetic scale is a sensitive piece of equipment, and therefore caution is needed for proper handling, use, and storage

 

I think I remember seeing this post shortly after you posted it.

I hope you don't mind me saying so, but it sounds rather like an advert. Possibly because you like it and believe in it.

There are a few of your statements which raise doubts:

3) Can detect fakes that the Sigma failed to pick up

I think this refers to a test of a silver coin you describe later, but this was not convincing.

5) A PM's magnetism can't be faked, making this a perfect tool 

You have not fully explained what you mean by this.

There are some of your "cons" which I suspect make GVS rather impractical or inconvenient to us.

There are some errors, assumptions, or omissions in some of your later posts showing tests.

ūüėé

Chards

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On 23/11/2021 at 02:21, SilverStorm said:

In my first PM testing of the GVS scale, I used a 1 oz Krugerrand gold coin.  This gold coin has a metal composition of 91.67% Au, and 8.33% Cu.   Using the Sigma PMV Pro Mini, the Krugerrand showed a resistivity of 10.12 and the arrow is in the green band.   The Sigma confirms the Krugerrand is genuine.   The secondary test with the GVS Bullion Tester showed a value of 0.024.   When we look at the GVS chart for the Krugerrand, the range of acceptability is -0.128 to 0.040.  The tested value is within range, and the Krugerrand is considered genuine.   By combining the two test results, I am very confident that the Krugerrand is genuine.  

 

"In my first PM testing of the GVS scale, I used a 1 oz Krugerrand gold coin."

Which date? It looks from your photos like 1980, but this is unclear.

"This gold coin has a metal composition of 91.67% Au, and 8.33% Cu."

Where did you get that information?

How do you know it is correct?

"The Sigma confirms the Krugerrand is genuine. "

No, the Sigma only confirms the composition of Krugerrand is within the parameters which the Sigma tested for. This is not the same as confirming it is genuine.

"The secondary test with the GVS Bullion Tester showed a value of 0.024.   When we look at the GVS chart for the Krugerrand, the range of acceptability is -0.128 to 0.040."

That sounds like a a very wide range, so wide as to almost meaningless, although you have not mentioned what total ranges the GVS can read or is calibrated for.

ūüėé

Chards

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On 23/11/2021 at 03:30, SilverStorm said:

My second testing of the GVS scale involves the much beloved Sovereigns.    I tested two Sovereigns; the Sovereigns' composition consists of 0.917 Au, and 0.083 Cu or other metals.   The Sigma Pro Mini showed the Sovereigns with a resistivity of 10.09 and the arrow in the green band.  Sigma confirms authenticity for both.   I then tested the Sovereigns using the GVS scale.   The first Sovereign checked in at exactly 0.000, and the second Sovereign checked in at 0.005.  Unfortunately, the GVS chart does not show values for the small Sovereign coin, only for the 1 lb and half lb Sovereigns.   But if we use the target values provided for both (-0.012 to 0.011 & -0.010 to 0.009 respectively), we can see the tested values fall within both ranges.  We can conclude that both coins are considered genuine.

"I tested two Sovereigns"

Which dates?

"the Sovereigns' composition consists of 0.917 Au, and 0.083 Cu or other metals."

It could be important to know their composition more exactly in respect of the Cu or other metals.

"Unfortunately, the GVS chart does not show values for the small Sovereign coin,"

Gold sovereigns only come in one size and weight, even though the precise alloy compositions do vary.

The fact that you refer to a "small Sovereign" has caused imaginary big red lights to flash on and off in my brain. I had to get up, walk around, make a cup of tea, and I am still struggling to express my thoughts without alienating you. Do you mean a half sovereign, a quarter sovereign, or something else?

"only for the 1 lb and half lb Sovereigns."

This further taxes my brain as to your meaning.

The abbreviation "lb" is used to denote one pound avoirdupois in weight; this is approximately 454 grams. Gold sovereigns are specified as 7.98805 grams. I would love to see a gold sovereign weighing 454 grams!

I suspect you mean that the GVS chart does show values for a so-called "full" sovereign, and a half sovereign, from which I would infer that the "small Sovereign coin" you mention is in fact a quarter sovereign, not a sovereign. 

I further supect that you may have allowed yourself to be influenced and fooled by a rather questionable practice by the Royal Mint of referring to "The Sovereign" on its website, and packaging, when referring not only to gold sovereigns, but also to fractional and multiple sovereigns. This dumb practice is presumably the brainchild of its marketing department, perhaps in a brain-adled attempt to turn "The Sovereign" into a brand or sub-brand. Whetever their reason, it is wrong, and it creates unnecessary and regrettable confusion.

ūüėé

Edited by LawrenceChard

Chards

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