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Question about 1826 Shilling


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Hey everyone, what do you all think of this 1826 Shilling?

I’m attaching several pics of the obverse and reverse in different angles. 

Please see pics of the reverse in the next post.

It’s available to me from a dealer for £350.

I have almost zero knowledge of these early silver coins, but this one caught my eye simply because of the sharp strike and lovey toning.

Any thoughts on whether this is a decent price, or is it just my heart being silly?

Edit: I uploaded a video as well: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1-JErKdkJQ-7bWQny-OUSz7qBUcAv8I5v

92A03E6A-E723-4024-8E79-3196BEC77A47.png

05DF12D8-E8FF-4858-ABA6-22D3C122B23C.png

8C67CB9B-7A4F-4B10-9376-738BE2115183.png

Edited by westminstrel
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Book price on an uncirculated shilling of 1826 is around £200. EF is around £60.

It's difficult to tell from the photos but i will assume it has been cleaned - a 200 year old silver coin should be a lot darker in it's natural state. That may bother you or it may not - most older coins have had a clean in the past (There also apears to be cleaning solution visible in the lettering of 'defensor').

I would grade it somewhere around EF (but cleaned) - there appears to be minimal wear but the fields show a lot of marks/scratches.

Although it's a coin with good eye-appeal, for the same money you could get a Charles II crown in GF or a George III in EF.... or a run of late George V in Unc.

I would expect the dealer to have paid around £40 for it.

 

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Yes I would say it’s a bit strong price wise too, as as said above while it has lovely detail there’s are lots of minor scratches on the fields which would suggest past cleaning. For comparison (I know it’s far more toned and far nicer IMO but that will vary person to person) the below example was sold for £100

CF29E6D0-5909-49F9-9C21-5436D0B9C31B.png

77DDBC35-8CCB-4CC7-B2A2-C2835224C39C.png

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Hey @westminstrel, I take onboard what others have said and see their point, but looking at the video I do wonder if its a slightly circulated / poorly looked after proof or early strike circulation coin (proof-like). Seems expensive if it is just circulation, but if the dealer is reputable its probably worth a call to him to discuss because if proof the price probably isn't too far off imo...

Best of luck!

Edited by SilverMike
grammar and missing words...
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43 minutes ago, SilverMike said:

Hey @westminstrel, I take onboard what others have said and see their point, but looking at the video I do wonder if its a slightly circulated / poorly looked after proof or early strike circulation coin (proof-like). Seems expensive if it is just circulation, but if the dealer is reputable its probably worth a call to him to discuss because if proof the price probably isn't too far off imo...

Best of luck!

Thanks very much for your suggestion. I’m back on the fence now. 😅

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I really don't know if it was minted as a proof (though i suspect not)- it appears to have a little too much abrasion on the fields though - generally proof coins are a little more treasured than circulating ones and don't often get lost down the settee !

To me the example matt1r posted has more appeal eye and appears to be more natural. I would go for the grey toned coin every time.

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Almost certainly not a proof, just a well-struck example.

As others have said, the price is very strong for what is essentially quite a common coin of that type.  If it was an 1827 or 1829, it would be a different story.

I'd grade it at EF to GEF and I'm not sure whether it has been cleaned.  Anyway, as TeaTime has said earlier, book price for an UNC version is £200 and I wouldn't pay £200 for this particular coin.

1826 shillings are relatively easy to find in high grades, I don't think you'd do well with it from an 'investment' point of view if that's important to you.

I have an 1829 example of this type but in lower, circulated grade.  It has had some life, I wonder whose hands it passed through and what it bought...

 

M Shilling 1829.jpg

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Yes sadly I am on my phone the moment, I can not understand the auto correct on this blessed thing. Or was it simply fat fingers?😄

Edited by sovereignsteve
wax for was???

I love sovereigns, me😁

 

BullionByPost referral program recommended for sovereigns at less than spot 🙂

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