Jump to content
  • The above Banner is a Sponsored Banner.

    Upgrade to Premium Membership to remove this Banner & All Google Ads. For full list of Premium Member benefits Click HERE.

  • Join The Silver Forum

    The Silver Forum is one of the largest and best loved silver and gold precious metals forums in the world, established since 2014. Join today for FREE! Browse the sponsor's topics (hidden to guests) for special deals and offers, check out the bargains in the members trade section and join in with our community reacting and commenting on topic posts. If you have any questions whatsoever about precious metals collecting and investing please join and start a topic and we will be here to help with our knowledge :) happy stacking/collecting. 13,000+ forum members.

Using an eraser on a proof coin? Thoughts?


Recommended Posts

Hi Just got this email from Goldsilver.be after I ordered a proof 1kg Libertad that had  tarnishing on the coin... 

They advised the use of an eraser? ... thought this left micro scratches? 

How would you respond. Doesn’t account for the box which I will have to repair hing on otherwise.  

 

C1C48C4A-5998-4DEC-9F53-4A823E93989E.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

NO...NO....NO
You will destroy a proof's finish especially a Libertad which has a mirror finish ( I assume based on my smaller coins ).
The slightest abrasion, even if from a softer material like an eraser, will blemish the surface.
Yes it may remove the tarnish BUT you will notice the difference between the rubbed zone and its surroundings.
Trust me - this will look pretty bad when tilted in different lighting conditions.

If you really need to get rid of tarnish I believe E-Zest will do this for you and there are references to people cleaning proofs without noticeable damage.
This is a dipping solution and relatively expensive in the UK because of shipping regulations leaving the USA where it is cheap and can be bought by the gallon.
You could make your own using thiouric acid but this is dangerous stuff ( carcinogenic I believe ) and the surface only wants exposure for a few seconds at a time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would say that you should never touch the surface of a Proof coin, as it will immediately impair the surface, as Pete has said with micro abrasions, which can be seen a mile away on a proof coin.

Any cleaning the removes or alters the surface will damage a Proof, which will leave it almost impossible to sell as anything other than weight(might be exceptions when it comes to rarity).   

On bullion I wouldn't even use a "school rubber",---if you really can't live with marks on a bullion best bet rubber wise is to use a really soft artist putty, however really small area's at a time.

I tried a piece of silicone that I glued to the flat side of a scalpel just to see if the worked---It worked for some marks, however wasn't the best.

(wife wasn't pleased that I had cut up her baking mat !!).

I really would not touch it as they will say you damaged it--if you paid bullion price fair enough--if you paid Proof price, you should get a Proof standard coin not matter what the size.              

Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem with buying a proof coin is in the acepted definition of 'proof'. A proof coin is any coin that has been struck to proof standard. It does not refer to the condition of the coin, merely the standard by which it was struck. Even a coin that has been run over by a truck is still considered proof. This may well be the arguement GS.be give you if you try and return the coin.

Saying that, the advice given to you from GS.be is completely wrong - you should never use any type of abrasive on a mirror-finished coin. Oxidation (not milk spots, scratches or scuffs etc) on silver is normal and to be expected. On collector coins it is often highlighted by such phrases as 'gorgeous golden tone' , 'light chocolate highlights' and other equally banal phrases..... 😶

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, TeaTime said:

The problem with buying a proof coin is in the acepted definition of 'proof'. A proof coin is any coin that has been struck to proof standard. It does not refer to the condition of the coin, merely the standard by which it was struck. Even a coin that has been run over by a truck is still considered proof. This may well be the arguement GS.be give you if you try and return the coin.

Saying that, the advice given to you from GS.be is completely wrong - you should never use any type of abrasive on a mirror-finished coin. Oxidation (not milk spots, scratches or scuffs etc) on silver is normal and to be expected. On collector coins it is often highlighted by such phrases as 'gorgeous golden tone' , 'light chocolate highlights' and other equally banal phrases..... 😶

Thanks. Now if I can get them an official link/site to send them is proof this is bad information to give a customer. Any good links? Maybe from Spink or The Royal Mint? 
 

Bit annoyed GS.be has the nerve to insult me having spent £££ with them. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

That is a very bad idea and I'm actually shocked that a big dealer like gs.be would suggest this. A rubber leaves really ugly smudge marks on a proof coin. It might work on bullion coins which have a lot of structure and not a lot of polished parts, but even then the results vary. But using a rubber on a proof coin? Never. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The impression i get from reading posts about GSbe is that they really won't care about what you have to say. They remind me of junk dealers - they may well sell silver and gold coins but to them it's just a commodity. 'You paid for x amount of silver/gold and you recieved x amount of silver/gold. End of story'.. The nuances of collecting coins is beyond them (as is the premium we pay to have the PM formed into aesthetically pleasing forms).

 
I'm not aware of any 'official' sites that state you shouldn't clean proof coins, but it is common sense and the majority of mints state as much on their COAs.
I've used GSbe before and been lucky with my purchases - but there is always that element of keeping my fingers crossed until the coins arrive...
 
Good luck with your endeavours :)
Edited by TeaTime
information
Link to post
Share on other sites

Was this a proof coin bought at a bullion sized premium? Were they selling as bullion?

If so they may not refund based on the weight of the coin and silver content.

Maybe they should have stated condition and sold as bullion on their listing though, to avoid any confusion of bagging a bargain.

Decus et tutamen (an ornament and a safeguard)

YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5OjxoCIsDbMgx7MM_l4CmA

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
On 30/11/2020 at 08:31, MancunianStacker said:

Was this a proof coin bought at a bullion sized premium? Were they selling as bullion?

If so they may not refund based on the weight of the coin and silver content.

Maybe they should have stated condition and sold as bullion on their listing though, to avoid any confusion of bagging a bargain.

Selling as proof coin Paid over £1000 for the coin. I would not order proofs from this company again. 

As we all know their customer service is poor at the best of times, but the fact they keep changing their phone number and you can only contact them via email is a give away its the wild west when it comes to buying PM's from them. 

I am realising it maybe a little cheaper getting silver though them, but at least if you buy though TSF you will get better service and follow up and less likely to get what you want.  Long live TSF! :)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

If its a silver proof coin and its just tarnish on it, you could use silver dip. While I have to say "you shouldn't clean coins" I often dip silver coins, including proofs and they come out fine, just dont over do it. I would never rub the surface in any way though so dont use an eraser on it or anything. Dip should be safe, 2 mins then a rinse with deionised water and dry with a cool air drier (not a hot hairdryer but one on a cold setting should be fine) and it will prob remove most of the tarnish.

End of the day how much worse can it get, you have a tarnished silver coin that you wont get your money back on so its essentially bullion if its really that bad, so dip it and see how it turns out.

Can you post some pics so we can see how bad it is?

Interested in any (particularly Gold) coins from the year 1977 only.
Looking for bullion deals? - Try https://bullionsupermarket.com/ 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, terakris said:

If its a silver proof coin and its just tarnish on it, you could use silver dip. While I have to say "you shouldn't clean coins" I often dip silver coins, including proofs and they come out fine, just dont over do it. I would never rub the surface in any way though so dont use an eraser on it or anything. Dip should be safe, 2 mins then a rinse with deionised water and dry with a cool air drier (not a hot hairdryer but one on a cold setting should be fine) and it will prob remove most of the tarnish.

End of the day how much worse can it get, you have a tarnished silver coin that you wont get your money back on so its essentially bullion if its really that bad, so dip it and see how it turns out.

Can you post some pics so we can see how bad it is?

Point taken. Tarnish is mild and not enough for me to risk the effect it would have on the matte finish on the coin. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Cookies & terms of service

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. By continuing to use this site you consent to the use of cookies and to our Privacy Policy & Terms of Use