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HillWalkerDundee

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  1. The point is that neither the supplier, DHL, RM nor HMRC are above the law. All VAT registered businesses are well aware of the law so the chances of an error being made is minimal. Your supply date will be mid to late December and would never have attracted additional charges. Anyone with a date of supply post BREXIT transition period will incur charges.
  2. Shropshire Again, it is down to the date of supply irrespective of when it was ordered or received. Look at your invoice, it will have a date of supply and this will be 31/12/2020 or before.
  3. ChrisSilver "So I am therefore unsure if that margin scheme is still applicable after Brexit" The margin scheme is alive and kicking. It is used extensively in the second user market e.g. used cars, antiques etc.
  4. Martlet "Only the end consumer pays the VAT. " Not quite. It is the customer not the consumer (they are different things) that pay VAT. There is a customer at every stage of the journey to the last buyer in the chain. VAT = Value Added Tax. At each stage, value is added to the item, may be design, may be manufacture, may be distribution, may be retail. All of these processes are taxed and reclaimed until the last leg. When you add up all the sales VAT and subtract all the purchase VAT, only the last customer pays the full VAT. Even the last payer of VAT may then be
  5. Judging from the above, together with various links describing similar sort of issues, this is the start of the chickens coming home to roost. People voted to leave the EU, they (presumably) knew what this meant, so there shouldn't be any complaints. There will be many more issues like this for many years to come.
  6. "This is however not entirely accurate. Date of supply for VAT purposes does not equal invoice date." Is that not what I said? That is why I said "(see later). It doesn't matter when you ordered the goods or when the goods were received, it is the date of supply" and then explained timing differences in my last sentence. You are absolutely right, the date of supply is what counts.
  7. PS. What price, year and condition?
  8. Re: Sweden, With VAT in any EU country (and UK) the most important bit is the date of supply i.e when the goods were invoiced (see later). It doesn't matter when you ordered the goods or when the goods were received, it is the date of supply. As for Canada, up until 31st December, the goods would come under the deal struck with the EU. From 1st January, different rules apply, what rules I don't know. Re: invoice dates. This date may differ from the date of supply. Often it is the same but can be a day or two out.
  9. Bimetallic I always find it useful to know something about the subject before posting a view. I don't know enough enough about ex President Trump's gay tendencies to comment. I probably know as much about that as you do about the NHS.
  10. It is not unheard off for certain business owners to take out a Business Bounce Back Loan and put the money into premium bonds, keep the winnings and repay the zero interest loan at the end of the term.
  11. You mean that there is a chance any of us will ever forget it? 🙂 If I had a choice between a medal and a lobotomy, I wouldn't choose the medal.
  12. I suppose it does depend on what you bought them for and if your circumstances have changed. If the purchase is for investment, then yes, now is a good time as any to sell. If the purchase was to protect your wealth in readiness for the great reset then the time isn't right. Back to you.
  13. Sorry, but ordering the goods before the end of Brexit holds no water whatsoever in tax law. VAT is applied at the date of supply and not the date of order. Sorry, but that is basic VAT law and has been ever since inception.
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